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Sundance and FIS Worlds will overlap in 2019.

Posted: Tue, 20 Mar 2018 03:50:31 PDT

Jay Hamburger
March 17, 2018

As the Sundance Film Festival in 2019 reaches the final reels in Park City, the FIS World Championships in freestyle disciplines will be in the starting gate.

The two events, expected to be among the largest held in Park City next year, overlap on three days in early February, meaning that festival-goers and freestyle skiing fans will crowd into the city at t he same time. They could compete for hotel rooms, restaurant tables, taxi or shuttle rides and other services that are required when major events are held during the winter.

The various figures involved in the planning are aware of the overlapping days, and they say steps have been taken to ensure the operations are smooth. City Hall, Sundance and the organizing committee for the FIS World Championships will eventually craft finalized plans that will be expected to address the various aspects of the overlap.

But the three days in early February could also spur questions as the month approaches about the impact of Park City's busy event calendar on the community, something that has already proven to be a difficult discussion as leaders weigh the business that events generate against the peacefulness wishes of Parkites.

The film festival in 2019 runs from Jan. 24 until Feb. 3 at various locations in the Park City area. The dates are pushed back by a week from what would be typical to avoid a conflict with the Martin Luther King Jr. Day weekend, which is usually a busy three-day stretch at the mountain resorts. The FIS World Championships, meanwhile, run from Feb. 1 until Feb. 10 at Park City Mountain Resort, Deer Valley Resort and Solitude Mountain Resort.

The final days of the film festival do not buzz like the opening ones, but Park City remains busy throughout the event. There are usually heavy weekend crowds, and crews spend at least several days dismantling the numerous temporary Sundance setups and installations. The preparations for the FIS World Championships will be expected to be occurring alongside the hubbub of Sundance.

City Hall plans to provide detailed information about the logistical aspects of the overlap later. Jenny Diersen, who is the special events and economic development program manager for the municipal government, said officials are working with the Sundance organizers and the FIS World Championships event team as plans are considered. She said information could be provided publicly by late in the spring. Diersen said City Hall, though, is excited Park City will host two events of international renown at the same time.

A Sundance spokesperson said it is too early to discuss details about the planning for the 2019 event and the overlap with the FIS World Championships. Sundance organizers typically engage City Hall in ongoing discussions throughout the year as they plan for the annual January festival. It seems almost certain some of the upcoming talks between Sundance and City Hall will center on the overlap.

The chair of the organizing committee for the FIS World Championships said the event planning has taken into account the overlapping days. Calum Clark, who is also the chief of systems and operations for the United States Ski and Snowboard Association, said the International Ski Federation must still approve the schedule.

Clark said the organizers were aware of the overlap shortly after the event was awarded. He also noted that a major United States Ski and Snowboard Association event was held during Sundance in 2014. The team that competed in the Olympics in Sochi, Russia, the next month was named at the 2014 event.

"We just try to be as neighborly as possible," Clark said. "And make it as good as we can."

Clark said there are plans to hold a nighttime competition at PCMR in an unspecified discipline on Feb. 2, the Saturday of the closing weekend of Sundance. Training is planned at PCMR and Deer Valley starting on Feb. 1. The venues must also be set up, including the requirements for broadcasting crews. On the overlapping days, he said, most of the events of the FIS World Championships will be staged at Solitude Mountain Resort.

"It's going to be exciting. It showcases the best of this town," Clark said about the overlapping dates of Sundance and the FIS World Championships.


Utah News!

Posted: Sun, 18 Mar 2018 02:09:32 PDT

These are the states where the economy is strong and opportunities are growing.

Utah ranked #2 state where the economy is strong and opportunities are growing!

Looking for a new job? You may want to consider moving to a different state. The U.S. News & World Report’s Best States just released their annual rankings that measures how well states’ economies are performing. They looked at 77 metrics across eight categories, provided by McKinsey & Company’s Leading States Index, including economic status. Data points that fell under the economy growth umbrella include:

  • Job growth
  • Growth of each state’s GDP between 2013 and 2016
  • Business environment (monthly birth rate for new businesses)
  • Unemployment rate
  • Participation in labor force for everyone 16 and older
  • Number of people moving in and out of a state was taken into account
  • Tax burden
  • The number of top company headquarters per capita
  • Venture capital disbursed
  • Entrepreneurship (“business birth rate”)
  • Patent creation
So who took the top prize? Well if you are currently on either coast, consider heading towards the middle of the country as Colorado and Utah took the top spots, while Idaho and Texas made it into the Top 10 as well:
  1. Colorado
  2. Utah
  3. Washington
  4. California
  5. Florida
  6. Oregon
  7. Idaho
  8. Texas
  9. Massachusetts
  10. Delaware
For the first time this year, the rankings looked at “Quality of life” which included drinking water quality, pollution, voter participation and community engagement.

Utah, Colorado, Washington, and Massachusetts also all made it into the top 10 list for Best States Overall.


Colorado and Utah growing in the tech sector

Colorado taking the No. 1 slot is not a big surprise as its unemployment rate has been low for a while for the state with a population of 5.54 million. It is home to multiple booming industries including tech, agriculture, real estate, energy, tourism, craft beer, and everyone’s new favorite, cannabis.

The state’s tech scene has become particularly relevant as the state employs hundreds of thousands of employees. Let’s also not forget that Google’s new Boulder campus plans to hire thousands of people this year. Colorado also continues to be a hub for startups and Inc. even dubbed Boulder “America’s Startup Capital.”

Similar to Colorado, Utah (population 3.05 million) is also seeing huge growth in the tech space. Nicknamed the “Silicon Slopes,” Utah is home to and Omniture. And because of the tech boom, there is also a strong, venture capitalist community present as well. It should also be noted that Utah came in at No. 3 for “Opportunity” which took into account metrics including education, income inequality, and tools for economic success.


Ikon or Epic? Which should you choose?

Posted: Fri, 16 Mar 2018 17:09:02 PDT


Your Best Ski Vacation: Should You Choose Ikon or Epic Pass?

Larry Olmsted. | Feb. 27, 2018

Yesterday I wrote about the impending debut of the newest multi-resort ski pass shaking up the winter sports industry, the Ikon Pass. Aimed squarely at competing with Vail Resorts’ very popular Epic Pass, the Ikon product is being introduced on March 6 by Alterra Mountain Company, a joint venture between KSL Capital Partners and Aspen Skiing Company, in partnership with Aspen’s four mountains (not part of Alterra), ski resort operators Boyne Resorts and POWDR, and several independent resorts. After years of ski industry consolidation, very few world-class indies remain, and among this elite group, most have suddenly chosen sides, with Jackson Hole, Alta and Snowbird going Ikon, while Telluride just jumped in bed with Epic.

It used to be that only avid skiers living near a mountain bought a season pass, but now it makes economic sense for just about anyone who spends more than 5-6 days a season skiing, including home and ski vacations. The big question is, which pass?

Skiers nationwide (and even overseas) now face a complex decision over which product to go with, Epic or Ikon. Ultimately this will come to down to where you ski regularly when home, and where you want to ski on vacation. In yesterday’s piece on the new Ikon pass, I listed all the members and options in detail, but to recap, the pass covers 30 mountains at 26 resort destinations in the US and Canada, some unlimited and some not. The Epic Pass, which I wrote about in more detail last year,  includes unlimited access to the 14 Vail Resorts mountains across the US, Canada, and Australia, plus Arapahoe Basin, 7-days at Colorado’s Telluride, and free days (not unlimited) at six massive European mega resorts in Italy, France, Austria and Switzerland, including stunning Val d'Isere, which I just reviewed, three of the world’s four largest and totaling about 30 different mountains. Both passes are available in premium and discounted, scaled down versions.

To Read more click:

Future Winter Olympics, fingers crossed!

Posted: Fri, 16 Feb 2018 03:46:29 PST

Summit County contemplates its role in future bid for Winter Olympics. It may be a challenge but they are excited!

Park Record, by Angelique McNaughton,  February 10, 2018
As Utah strides toward seeking a bid for the Winter Olympic Games in 2030, Summit County leaders are beginning to explore what kind of role the county would play if the Games were to be hosted again in the region.

The state's exploratory committee announced on Wednesday that Salt Lake City and the Winter Olympic region should pursue a second Games. The 2002 Olympic Games were held at Olympic venues in the area. An estimated 2,345 athletes competed and 1,200 officials came from 80 nations participated.

A representative from the County Council or county staff was noticeably absent from the exploratory committee, with Park City Mayor Andy Beerman the only elected official from Park City or Summit County participating.

County Manager Tom Fisher said the county was still included in some of the discussions as the members of the committees examined the region's current infrastructure and venues. He admitted, though, the county would need to play a more significant role in the upcoming months and years to prepare for a Games.

"There is so much to think about in regards to Salt Lake City hosting the Games," he said. "We are now starting to meet with our partners in the municipalities to explore what we need to have lined up for Summit County to get ready for a Games.

"I think the community and the county government is excited about it," he added. "We see the possibility and need to be ready to step up to that challenge."

When the Games were hosted in the region in 2002, more figures from Park City than Summit County were involved. But, Fisher said the county has experienced significant changes since that time.

"Kimball Junction, as it is now, did not exist in 2002," he said. "There was no commercial property, Park City Tech Center or transit center, and we had just rebuilt the interchange to handle the Olympic traffic."

The impacts of a Games in the unincorporated areas of the county near the Utah Olympic Park and Canyons Village at Park City Mountain Resort would require critical discussions in the interim, Fisher said.

"That has to happen at a higher level, and we are going to have to put some brain power around that," he said.

One of the major points of discussion will likely surround the impact a Games would have on traffic in the area and the transportation component that would be necessary to handle it. Fisher said a housing component would also be a part of those conversations, as well as security, crowds and event management.

"In starting to think about that large event in 2030, we have to think about what we have to do to prepare," he said. "We have to not only talk to the state, but the federal government and the United States Olympic Committee to understand what we have to put together as far as a community. That probably means some resources going towards the Games either with people or money."

The county would likely be eligible for help with the finances and staffing required to host another Games in the region. Fisher emphasized the financial responsibility and other necessities, such as security, would not fall solely on the shoulders of the county.

"That's not looked at as a local responsibility," he said. "There would be some leveraging of resources to advance the goals of the community. What does it take with transportation and security, those are rarely local responsibilities. We will share the burden with the state and whoever is putting on the event over this period of time if we win that bid for 2030, and we will be working with these groups to figure out whose responsibility is what."

Fisher said a bid for the Games could provide the county with an opportunity to advance some of its transportation goals at a more accelerated rate compared to if only the county was paying for them.

"Having an Olympics brings in outside resources to bear that might be able to advance some of those things sooner," he said.

Representatives of the Utah Olympic Legacy Foundation are scheduled to meet with the County Council on Feb. 21 to ask the county to act as a conduit for financing certain projects related to the foundation's venues. Fisher said it would be about $17 million worth of bonds, with most of those at the Utah Olympic Park and at least one project at the Park City Ice Arena.

"That's somewhat related to a future Games, but more related to the Olympic Legacy Foundation and the venue that they take care of as part of that overall Olympic legacy," he said.

When the state made its first bid to host a Games, the Salt Lake Organizing Committee began preparing for the event in the late 1980s. While Utah lost the bid for the 1998 Olympics to Japan, the state was later awarded the opportunity to host the 2002 Games.

"It sounds like 12 years away is plenty of time to do something like that, but they spent about 15 years figuring out bidding and doing all that stuff," Fisher said. "We are kind of in that same timeline. It will be different than it was before because we are a lot more sophisticated as far as future desire, needs and vision on how we would want to operate. We need to come together very quickly to project that vision."


Here are 6 ways to experience the Winter Games at the Utah Olympic Park!

Posted: Mon, 12 Feb 2018 10:40:40 PST


If you can't make the trip to the Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea, experience the excitement of Olympic events closer to home at Utah Olympic Park in Park City, Utah.

A popular winter destination, Salt Lake City became internationally known when it hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics. Located 28 miles east of the city near Park City, the Utah Olympic Park hosted five events during the Olympics.

"The Park is so special because it's a rarity in the entire world. The venue has been around since before the 2002 Winter Olympic Games, and we still operate our sliding track and ski jumps at a world-class level and host international events all the while offering unique activities that the general public can enjoy," said Kole Nordmann, marketing manager for Utah Olympic Park.

The hills at the Utah Olympic Park recently determined some of the Americans who get to vie for medals in the upcoming games in PyeongChang.

"We aren't just a training facility for elite athletes. We offer myriad activities and experiences that the entire family can enjoy," Nordmann said.

Today, visitors can tour the Joe Quinney Winter Sports Center, which includes a ski museum, and you can watch professional skiers practice on the Nordic and aerial jumps. When the skiers are not practicing, the jumps are open to the public.

While some of these attractions are available by purchasing a day pass, the entire park is open to the public to roam and wander the grounds, reliving the Olympic experience. Some visitors might even see an Olympian.

"Some [Olympians] work for our foundation or work as coaches for bobsled, skeleton, luge, ski jumping, aerials and moguls. You really never know who you'll run into on any given day as they are around all the time," Nordmann said.

Here is a list of ways to experience the Winter Games at Utah Olympic Park:

Experience a bobsled ride

If you're into thrills, try the Utah Olympic Park bobsled ride. It is an exhilarating ride on the Salt Lake 2002 Olympic Winter Games Sliding Track, where Olympians once competed.

It is one of the longest slides in the world, with over 3,000 feet of gliding and sliding.

Read more

Things to do in the Winter in Park City

Posted: Thu, 21 Dec 2017 01:58:42 PST

Taking a day off from skiing or deciding to end a day on the mountain early? Here are some of the amazing activities throughout Park City and the surrounding areas.


  • Park City Museum – Conveniently located in the heart of Main Street, the Park City Museum is dedicated to promoting, protecting, and preserving the rich history and heritage of Park City. From the mining days of old, to the current resort style community, the Park City Museum captures the past and present of Park City.
  • The Egyptian Theater – The Egyptian Theatre is Park City's historic home for live stage performances. Located on Main Street, this local favorite offers a variety of professional weekly entertainment, including concerts and comedy, drama and dance, and community theatre. The Egyptian Theatre is also a premier destination during the annual Sundance Film Festival.
  • The Eccles Center – Bringing performing arts from the international stage to the Park City stage, The Eccles Center is dedicated to bringing world-class performances and new ideas to the community.
  • Art Galleries – Take a stroll down Main Street and experience all the amazing Art Galleries that Park City has to offer. From the Trove Gallery, Terzian Gallery, Gallery MAR, and so many more…there is something for everyone on Main Street.
  • Heber Valley Railroad North Pole Express – A family favorite, this 90-minute round trip to the North Pole includes hot cocoa and Mrs. Claus' famous chocolate chip cookies. You'll sing along to new and traditional Christmas favorites on the way and be entertained by our hosts, elves and cocoa chefs. When we reach the North Pole Santa will join us for the return trip and greet each child and present them with a special gift.
  • Deer Valley® Resort Events – Off the mountain, Deer Valley® showcases daily live music and après.
  • Park City Mountain – Off the mountain Park City Mountain showcases après events including live music, family friendly magicians, complimentary s’mores, balloon artists, and more!
  • Paint Mixer – The Paint Mixer is the ultimate creative and social venue with studios on Park City’s Historic Main Street. We can also accommodate groups at off-site locations, such as hotel banquet rooms, private homes, restaurants, and other party venues. The Paint Mixer appeals to anyone looking to create and connect in a fun environment… and no artistic experience is required!
  • Gorgoza Park – Looking for a fun activity the whole family can enjoy? Tubing is great for kids and for those who want to act like one. Lifts take you back to the top of the tubing lanes so you can enjoy the ride down without all the work. Most lanes are lighted, making tubing a great activity after the sun goes down. *Main photo credit
  • Kimball Art Center – Kimball Art Center (KAC) is dedicated to providing arts access, education, engagement and experience to everyone. Through our exhibitions, educational arts programs and events, KAC provides a platform and a place for artists and arts enthusiasts to come together to explore, celebrate, develop and cherish the creative spark that lives within us all.
  • Ice Skating at the Park City Ice Arena – The Park City Ice Arena is an indoor, year-round facility. The Olympic-size ice sheet offers a variety of activities including open skate sessions, private lessons, group rates, corporate outings and children’s camps.
  • Ice Skating at Park City Mountain – Join us at Park City's only outdoor ice skating rink. Centered at the base of Park City Mountain Resort, we offer convenient daily ice skating for all ages. Our ambient setting Christmas trees, lights, and upbeat music will put you in the mood for a great time. We offer sharp hockey/ figure skates, warm beverages, and complimentary skate walkers for children.
  • Utah Olympic Park and Museum – Utah Olympic Park offers year-round adventure. From learning about the Park’s unique Olympic heritage on a guided tour to taking a ride of a lifetime on the Comet Bobsled Ride, Utah Olympic Park offers activities for all. Zip, climb, hike, and explore Olympic history! The world-class museum facility highlights the history of all skiing disciplines through interactive touch screen displays, videos, virtual reality ski theater, games and topographical maps. Visitors can also experience the glory of the 2002 Olympic Winter Games through a gallery of visual highlights and artifacts from the 2002 games.
  • Homestead Resort’s Crater – One of the unique activities at our Midway Utah Resort is our one-of-a-kind Homestead Crater. The Crater is a geothermal spring, hidden within a 55-foot tall, beehive-shaped limestone rock located on the Homestead property. Once inside, you can go swimming, scuba diving, snorkeling, enjoy a therapeutic soak or even take a paddle board yoga class.
  • Shopping – Hit the Park City shops when the time comes (if ever) to take a break from all there is to do Park City, Utah. We're talking shopping for everything from handmade furniture, books and sportswear to art collectibles and Western antiques. Historic Main Street is lined with quaint shops and galleries, Redstone has boutique shops, and if you're in the mood for a brand-name bargains stop by Park City's popular Tanger Outlet Center.

Salt Lake City gears up to bid for 2030 Winter Olympics

Posted: Tue, 19 Dec 2017 11:55:44 PST

POSTED 5:59 PM, DECEMBER 18, 2017, BY , UPDATED AT 06:05PM, DECEMBER 18, 2017

At a meeting of the Salt Lake City Olympic/Paralympic Exploratory Committee on Monday, a number of high-level political leaders and power players discussed the logistics of hosting another games.

Fraser Bullock, who was the Chief Operating Officer of the 2002 Olympics and is a co-chair of the exploratory committee, said realistically Salt Lake City is looking at bidding for the 2030 Winter Olympics.

Bolstered by a new poll showing 89 percent of Utahns support hosting another Winter Olympics, Governor Gary Herbert said he believed the city and state should go for another bid.

"I think we’re best suited of any place in the world to host a winter games," the governor told reporters.

Utah would not need to build any new venues. The ones built for the 2002 Winter Olympics are still in operation. While they would not discuss how much it would cost to stage the Olympics (the amount is still being calculated), Bullock told FOX 13 it was in the ballpark of $1.5 to $1.6 billion. That's about $400 million less than it would cost other cities who might seek to bid and have to build new venues.

"We have the venues built, we’ve got experienced team members so we can hire them better. We can economize in many ways to make that budget work," Bullock said.

Gov. Herbert insisted that the economic benefits to Salt Lake City and the state of Utah were worth more than that. Research by the University of Utah's Kem Gardner Institute showed the state experienced an economic boost of nearly $5 billion as a direct result of the 2002 Olympics.

"The fact we hosted the Winter Olympics in 2002 has been a great door-opener for us on international business," the governor said.

Utah is also on better footing in terms of transportation planning and other issues. There were concerns about inversion and climate change resulting in fewer days below freezing, but advances in clean energy could mean a zero waste, 100-percent renewable energy Olympics (Mayor Jackie Biskupski has launched an initiative to have Salt Lake City on 100-percent renewable energy by 2030).

The ski resorts that served as venues for the 2002 Olympics are "all in" on another bid, the committee was told. Salt Lake City could be competing with Denver or Reno-Tahoe in the United States, and Sion, Switzerland; Stockholm, Sweden; Calgary, Canada; and Sapporo, Japan.

The deadline for Salt Lake City to declare its intent to bid for another Winter Olympics is March 31, 2018. The International Olympic Committee could award a bid by September 2019.


Posted: Mon, 11 Dec 2017 01:01:38 PST

2017 was a year of whites, grays, and marble...2018 has something very different in store! In 2018, look out for earth-tones, stonework, concrete accents, and more. Here are 5 home design trends to watch out for in 2018.

1. Warm Colors Everywhere Sherwin-Williams and Benjamin Moore have revealed their colors for 2018, a warm green-blue called Oceanside and a heavy, fire red called Caliente. 2018 looks to be the year of warm colors: reds, earthy browns such as camel and rust, burnt yellows, and deep grays. These colors make for a sophisticated and luxurious look.

2. Rustic Textures Concrete, stone, copper, and granite will be taking over 2018. Look out for rustic stone or trough sinks, concrete flooring or countertops, and copper accents in bathrooms and light fixtures.

3. Farmhouse And Florals Continuing from 2017, reclaimed wood and shiplap are here to stay in 2018. This continues to be a popular alternative to paint and wallpaper. Additionally, floral prints are back in a bold way. Think high-contrast teals and gold with over-sized blooms.

4. Color In The Kitchen While white will always be a classic kitchen color, 2018 looks for more color in the kitchen including grays, blues, and warm woods on the cabinets such as mahogany. Additionally, 2018 sees title backsplashes that imitate wood, concrete, or even wallpaper.

5. Calm, Modern Bedrooms Bedrooms are getting a minimalist makeover in 2018. With soft neutrals, delicate fabrics, and simple pieces, the bedroom will be designed as a place for calm and relaxation.

Originally sourced from Inman - 10 home design trends to watch out for in 2018 Photo credit: © Sea Pointe Construction via Houzz


Posted: Fri, 08 Dec 2017 04:12:59 PST

Our stunning state is known for its world-class skiing and snowboarding resorts, spectacular red rock deserts, and as one of the nation’s best states for business. Host of the 2002 Winter Olympic Games, Utah boasts a panorama of recreation and culture. From professional sports teams such as the Utah Jazz and Real Salt Lake, performance powerhouses such as the Utah Symphony, Ballet West, and Utah Opera, exceptional art galleries and concert venues, to award-winning restaurants and a lively nightlife scene… Utah showcases a limitless variety of activities and entertainment.

Salt Lake City International Airport is Utah’s gateway to the world. Ranked as one of the nation’s best for on time departures and arrivals and one of the lowest in percentage of flights cancelled. Salt Lake City’s airport is just 15 minutes from most Salt Lake neighborhoods and 40 minutes from Park City.

In the summer, Utah has it all when it comes to hiking, golf, mountain biking, backpacking, camping, fishing, boating, river rafting, rock climbing, and more. Home to the Mighty Five® National Parks, over 40 state parks, countless lakes and reservoirs, and some of the most scenic public and private golf courses in the country, many of which are championship-designated, there is something for everyone during the summer in Utah. Park City alone boasts over 400 continuous miles of trails which span two resorts and has been awarded the highest International Mountain Biking Association’s Gold-Level Ride Center designation.

In the winter, locals and visitors alike enjoy “The Greatest Snow on Earth” at Utah’s 14 world-class ski resorts. From Park City Mountain, the largest ski and snowboard resort in the United States, to Deer Valley®?  Resort which has been ranked the #1 Resort by Ski Magazine 6 times, to Snowbird®?  which features 3,240 vertical feet between the base and the summit, Utah has a resort for everyone. Whether it’s downhill skiing or cross country, snowshoeing or snowmobiling, an incredible winter adventure is just minutes away.

From the Wasatch Front cities of Ogden, Bountiful, Salt Lake, and South Jordan, to the Wasatch Back communities of Park City, Heber, and Kamas, there is a place for everyone in Utah. Live here, work here, play here. Contact your Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Utah Properties professional for the current market information on our exceptional state.

Waldorf Astoria Park City -Best Ski Hotel in the U.S.!

Posted: Tue, 05 Dec 2017 14:54:49 PST

Waldorf Astoria Park City

As distinctive and timeless as you’d expect from a Waldorf Astoria destination, this unique hotel is passionately committed to the comfort of each and every guest. Waldorf Astoria Park City is the only Forbes Four-Star Hotel located at the largest ski and snowboard resort in the United States, Park City Resort.

Unwind in the comfort of one of 160 unique guest rooms and spacious residences, offering custom-designed interiors, original local artwork and grand fireplaces. Just steps from our front doors, guests will find our dedicated Frostwood Gondola, providing access to the Resort to enjoy over 7,300 acres of terrain.

The award-winning Waldorf Astoria Spa is located within the hotel with tranquil surroundings to pamper guests with a range of lavish spa treatments, custom fitness area, and beauty salon. Also on property is the hotel restaurant, Powder. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily to encourage you to treat yourself to a mouthwatering seasonal menu inspired by the finest local ingredients.

For more information: Click here

Summit County, Utah to transition to 100 percent renewable electric energy

Posted: Tue, 24 Oct 2017 02:19:55 PDT

Angelique McNaughton / Park Record  |  October 14, 2017

Summit County’s elected officials agreed last week to help the community completely transition to renewable electric energy by the year 2032 as part of the county’s ongoing effort to reduce its reliance on fossil fuels.

The Summit County Council joined only three other confirmed counties in the country in making a similar declaration, according to a media release. It is the only resolution of its kind by a county in the state.

One hundred percent renewable electrical energy means that the amount of electrical energy that is annually consumed is equal to the amount of electricity that is produced through clean, renewable sources.

“This puts our community on the record that we are going to solve the problems that are facing the world right now,” said Glenn Wright, County Council member. “Climate change is going to have dramatic effects on Summit County.”

The resolution, approved on Wednesday, Oct. 6, recognizes the role people have played in accelerating global warming and creating greenhouse gases due to the overwhelming use of fossil fuels. According to the resolution, fossil fuel-based electricity generation causes about 30 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions in the incorporated and unincorporated areas of the county, while combustion of fossil fuels due to transportation causes an additional 47 percent of gases.

It highlights the devastating effects a warming climate would have on the county, such as shorter and warmer winters, variations in snowpack and precipitation, reduced stream flow, and devastation to forests, among several others.

Reducing the electrical energy supply to 100 percent renewable would require “combining renewable power generation with energy efficiency, energy storage, demand management and an enhanced transit and transportation system,” according to the resolution.

“If you look at the scientific projections for the change in our snowpack, it will dramatically decrease over the next 20 years,” Wright said. “It will be gone in 50. The effects worldwide have the potential to be catastrophic. My view is we all have to do our part and that’s what the resolution says about Summit County.”

County Council members spent nearly an hour discussing the costs and practicality of attaining the goals set in the resolution. They discussed similar plans that have been passed in Park City and Salt Lake City.

The resolution calls for an 80 percent reduction of 2016 greenhouse gas emissions from government operations by 2040 and requires annual emissions reporting. Elected officials plan to review the county’s progress every two years.

It outlines specific objectives to guide county departments, including collaborating with Rocky Mountain Power and other municipalities to advance legislation and policies supporting the resolution.

“Rocky Mountain Power is really key to this,” Wright said. “It is very difficult to do anything without involving them. I think dealing with Rocky Mountain Power will be interesting because, I think, in some ways senior corporate officers are recognizing the problem. But, they are also tasked with making the largest return they can for their investors. We have to make sure they make the right decision.”

Erin Bragg, executive director of Summit Community Power Works, said the organization worked closely with the county throughout the Georgetown energy prize competition and is familiar with helping advance the county’s initiatives.

“We are super excited and 100 percent behind the county moving in this direction,” Bragg said. “We are happy to see them taking the lead and they are only the third county in the nation to move to a 100 percent goal of renewable energy. It will be an asset to have the same goal as Salt Lake City, Park City and Moab.”

When it comes to sustainability and clean energy, Bragg said, Summit Community Power Works can help the community follow that path.

Since at least 2015, the County Council has identified environmental stewardship as one of its strategic goals. Council members have dedicated resources and programs to exploring sustainable options for county operations and discounted services, such as solar installation, for community members.

“This is one of the main reasons I ran for the County Council,” Wright said. “I thought we had to do more.”

To view the resolution, go to